Place names in the Staffordshire Moorlands.

ALSTONEFIELD.

This refers to either “the field containing Aene’s stone”, or the other possible meaning is “Aelfstan’s field”.

ALTON.

The meaning of the name Alton can be interpreted as “Aelfa’s settlement.

ASHCOMBE.

“Aesc” means ash tree and “cumb”means narrow valley which would translate as narrow valley containing trees growing in it.

ASHENHURST.

This translates as “the hill with ash trees growing on it”.

BALL HAYE GREEN.

This could possibly mean a “fair enclosure on a village green”

BASFORD.

The meaning of Basford comes from either “Beoreol’s ford” or the other interpretation is “the ford by the birch trees”.

BLACKSHAW.

The name Blackshaw is thought to have derived from the middle ages and is thought to mean “small black wood”.

BIDDULPH.

This is thought to mean the “place by the diggings” refering to a small quarry or mine.

BLORE.

This could either mean ” Blister” or “swelling” or to blow because of it being exposed.

BRADNOP.

This would refer to a broad area of useful land surrounded by moors.

BRUND.

This indictaes an area of land cleared by burning.

BUTTERTON.

This would refer to hill pastures used in the production of butter.

CALTON.

This name means farmstead where calves are reared.

CASTERN.

This word refers to “Caet’s thorn bush” which would probably have been some sort of boundary marker.

CAULDON.

The meaning of this is “calf hill” which infers that at one time calves were kept on the hill overlooking the village of Cauldon, the lowe part of Cauldon Lowe indicates a burial mound on top of the hill.

CHEADLE.

The meaning of this name is thought to be “the clearing in ced wood”.

CHEDDLETON.

This name is thought to have derived from the place where it is located, “settlement in a deep narrow valley”.

CONSALL.

This means a “corner in a deep valley”.

CROWBOROUGH.

This place takes its name from “crow wood”.

DIEULACRES.

The name of these ruins of an abbey on the outskirts of Leek means “may God increase it”.

DUNWOOD.

This simply means “wood on a hill”.

EASING.

This either means a “pasture” or “place” or could possibly mean the site of a Pagan holy place.

ECTON.

This is thought to mean “ecca’s tun”, or settlement.

ELKSTONE.

This means “Ealac’s hill”.

ELLASTONE.

It is thought the meaning of Ellastone is “Eadlac’s settlement”.

ENDON.

This either means “Eana’s hill” or possibly “lambs hill”.

FARLEY.

This is thought to mean a fern covered clearing in woodland.

FLASH.

This name could possibly be derived from “marshy pool”.

FOXT.

This name is fairly self explanatory and refers to a fox’s den.

FROGHALL.

Although sounding like something out of Wind in the Willows the name Froghall means “hollow of the frogs”.

GRINDON.

The village of Grindon takes its name from “green hill”.

GUN HILL.

This is thought to take its name from “the stream that runs off the moor called dun.

THE HAMPS.

This little river takes its name from “summer dry” as it dries upin the summer months.

HEATHYLEE.

This name is thought to have derived from “the clearing in the heath”.

HEATON.

This is thought to mean “high settlement or farm”.

HOLLINSCLOUGH.

This could possibly mean “holly growing in a steep ravine”.

HORTON.

The meaning of this word is “dirty or muddy settlement”

HULME.

This is thought to refer to ” an island in a marshy area”.

IPSTONES.

The word ipstones is thought to refer to a “raised look out stone”.

KINGSLEY.

This is thought to mean “the Kings clearing”.

LEEK.

This could mean a “leaking brook” and may refer to the spring which flows from the wall below St Edwards church.

LEEKFRITH.

This refers to a “woodland belonging to Leek”.

LONGNOR.

The meaning of this name comes from “long ridge”.

LONGSDON.

The meaning of this name was derived from “long hill”.

RIVER MANIFOLD.

This river takes its name from the fact that it winds a lot on its course and therefore its meaning is “having many folds”.

MEERBROOK.

This simply means “boundary brook”.

MORRIDGE.

This simply means “ridge of moorland”.

MIXON.

This unfortunate village takes its name from “dung heap”.

MUSDEN.

At one time this place must have had problems with mice as its name means ” valley infested with mice”.

OAKMOOR.

This simply means “the moor with oak trees on it”.

OKEOVER.

This refers to the “steep slope where oaks grow”.

QUARNFORD.

This means the “mill by the ford”.

RAMSHAW.

This is thought to have got its name from “a wood where a ram lives”.

RAMSHORN.

This name is thought to mean “rams ridge”.

THE ROACHES.

The meaning of this name is thought to simply mean”the rocks”.

ROWNALL.

This name is thought to mean a “rough nook or corner”.

RUDYARD.

This name is thought to come from an “enclosure”.

RUSHTON.

This is thought to mean “settlement by the rushes”.

STANLEY.

This is thought to refer to a “stoney clearing”.

STANSHOPE.

This means an “enclosed stoney valley”.

STANTON.

This is thought to mean “settlement on stoney ground”.

SWINSCOE.

This name simply means “pigs wood”.

THROWLEY.

This is thought to mean “a clearing near a steep valley”.

TITTESWORTH.

This name is thought to mean an “enclosed homestead”.

TOTMONSLOW.

This is thought to mean “the burial mound of Tatmann”

WARSLOW.

This could possibly mean “look-out mound”.

WETTON.

This simply means “the wet hills”.

WHISTON.

This is thought to mean “wita’s settlement”.

WOOTTON.

This simply means “the settlement by the wood”.

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One Response to “Place names in the Staffordshire Moorlands.”

  1. Quite Interesting. Drove through Okeover, Googled “Okeover etymology”, found this, smoked pipe and nodded sagely.

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